What do the two numbers on the telescope represent?

What do the two numbers on the telescope represent?  The two numbers on the telescope represent the telescope’s aperture and magnification.  The larger the aperture of the telescope, the higher the magnification of the telescope.  These two numbers also represent the resolution of the telescope.  

1. Telescope diameter  

The aperture of a telescope refers to the diameter of the telescope’s lens.  The larger the aperture, the wider the telescope’s field of view.  Generally speaking, the bigger the caliber, the more expensive it is.  This is because the larger the caliber, the more metal materials are required, and metal materials are relatively high prices.  

For example, a telescope with a diameter of 6.5 would have a magnification of 650.  The smaller the caliber, the lower the multiplier.  This is because the smaller the aperture, the more concentrated the beam, and the multiplier is a function of the speed at which the beam travels.  

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2. How to choose the telescope aperture?  

The aperture of a telescope is usually expressed in millimeters or inches.  A larger aperture means a larger field of view, but it also means a heavier and larger telescope.  When choosing a telescope’s caliber, the first thing to consider is the telescope’s purpose.  In general, a larger aperture gives a wider field of view, but it also increases the weight and size of the telescope.  

If you are primarily looking at close objects, you can choose a smaller aperture, such as a 6 or 8 mm telescope.  Larger diameters, such as a 25 mm or 50 mm telescope, can be used if the telescope is mainly used for observing distant objects.  For general observation, a diameter between 60 and 70mm is sufficient.  If you need to observe distant objects, you can choose a larger aperture.  

Also, consider the weight and volume of the telescope.  If you are carrying a telescope, choose a lighter one, such as a 6mm.  It saves weight and is easy to carry.  In addition, the larger the aperture of the telescope, the better the resolution of the object to be observed.  

3. Telescope power  

The multiplier of a telescope is the diameter of the telescope’s objective divided by its focal length.  This value determines the size of what the telescope can see.  The larger the magnification, the larger the size of the observed scene.  However, excessive multiplication can also bring adverse effects.  For example, too much magnification can cause the telescope to shake, which can affect the observation effect.  

4. How to choose telescope magnification?  

The multiplier of a telescope is the diameter of the telescope’s objective divided by its focal length.  In general, higher magnification results in a wider field of view, but also more noise and less visual edge sharpness.  Therefore, when choosing telescope power, you should choose according to your own needs and goals.  

The multiplier of a telescope is the aperture of the telescope multiplied by the multiplier of the telescope.  The aperture of a telescope refers to the diameter of the telescope’s lens. The larger the lens diameter, the lower the telescope’s power.  The closer the target is, the higher the multiplier is required.  

The telescope’s magnification can be adjusted as needed to get sharper images.  In general, the higher the telescope’s power, the sharper the image.  The smaller the telescope’s field of view, the fewer objects it can see.  

To get a better view, telescopes are usually between six and ten times more powerful.  Large magnification allows you to see objects farther away, while small magnification allows you to see objects closer.  The choice of the two multipliers depends on the distance and size of the object you are looking at.  If you need to observe a more distant target, you can choose a larger multiplier.  

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For example, if you want to observe a distant building, you can choose a large magnification.  If you want to look at a closer target, for example, if you want to look at a close tree, you can choose a smaller multiplier.  Choosing the right multiplier is important because it can help you get a better view.  Therefore, when choosing the power of a telescope, it is necessary to determine the occasion and the size of the target.  

5. Conclusion

The aperture and magnification of the telescope are one of the key factors affecting the observation effect.  Generally speaking, the larger the caliber, the higher the multiplier, the better the observation effect.  However, the aperture and magnification of a telescope also directly affect its weight and size.  Therefore, the choice of telescope aperture and magnification is very important.  After selecting the aperture and magnification of the telescope, other factors such as the cost and portability of the telescope should also be taken into account.  

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